Jauch und Mathematik

Ich kann nicht glauben, dass der Bericht so vollständig stehen bleibt:

„Auch bei der folgenden mathematischen Frage musste Scherbaum sich helfen lassen: Ein Kreis mit einem Umfang von 3.141,6 Metern hat einen Durchmesser von ziemlich genau …? A: 100 Metern, B: einem Kilometer, C: zehn Kilometern, D: 100 Kilometern. Scherbaums Telefonjoker? Passenderweise ein Mathelehrer. Doch dann der Super-GAU: 29 Sekunden entfleuchte dem Pädagogen kein einziges Wort. Kurz vor Abbruch der Verbindung dann ein entspanntes: „Schwer zu sagen“. Danke für Nichts! Ein betagter ehemaliger Physik-Student aus dem Publikum wusste mit B dann aber doch die richtige Antwort.“

Ein zweiter „Mathelehrer“ hatte dann nach diversen Berichten die richtige Lösung parat. Peinlich ist schon, wenn der Kandidat das nicht wenigstens abschätzen kann. Aber jemand, der irgend etwas mit Mathematik zu tun hatte und seine Nerven halbwegs zusammen hat, sollte das leicht wissen. Ich kann mir das nur durch hochgradige Aufregung erklären.

09. Januar 2018 von mga010
Kategorien: Deutsch | Schreibe einen Kommentar

Povray and Euler

I found a nice plot by Taha on my Google+ page. It uses a software called MathMod. Euler Math Toolbox can do this too teaming with Povray.

>load povray;
>povstart(zoom=4,distance=6,center=[1,0,0.5],height=45°);
>t=linspace(0,1,100); s=t';
>b=cos(2pi*s)*(t+0.01)+t; c=sin(2pi*s)*(t-0.01); a=t;
>X=cos(2pi*a)*(b+0.1); Y=sin(2pi*a)*(b+0.1); Z=c;
>writeln(povgrid(X,Y,Z,d=0.03,dballs=0,skip=[20,10]));
>povend();

This is all that is needed to generate the following spiraling tube.

Spiral-001Let me explain.

First of all, the pov…() commands generate text snippets which model graphical elements in the syntax of Povray. These text elements are written to a file by writeln(). The commands povstart() and povend() simply open and close the file and start the Povray interpreter. The output of this interpreter is then inserted into the notebook window of EMT.

For an example of such a Povray snippet, let us try the following.

 >povbox([0,0,0],[1,2,3],povlook(green))
 box { <0,0,0>, <1,2,3>
  texture { pigment { color rgb <0.0627451,0.564706,0.0627451> }  } 
  finish { ambient 0.2 } 
  }

This is a green box with side lengths 1,2,3.

The povgrid() command finally is able to draw the surface as a grid. We use the skip= parameter to skip most grid lines from drawing, but still get a smooth appearance of the grid.

The coordinates for the mantle surface of the tube are X,Y,Z. These three variables contain matrices. Thus X[i,j],Y[i,j],Z[i,j] is one point on the surface. To compute these matrices, we use the matrix language of EMT. First, s and t are two vectors, a row and a column vector with values from 0 to 1. Then we generate a cylindrically shaped surface with coordinates a,b,c.

>povstart(zoom=4,distance=6,angle=80°,center=[0,1,0]);
>t=linspace(0,1,100); s=t';
>b=cos(2pi*s)*(t+0.01)+t; c=sin(2pi*s)*(t+0.01); a=t;
>for i=1 to 3; writeAxis(0,1.2,axis=i,c=lightgreen); end;
>writeln(povgrid(a,b,c,d=0.03,dballs=0,skip=[50,50]));
>povend();

Spiral-002

This cylindrical surface is then wrapped around the z-axis (point upwards). The details are a bit involved. But any mathematician should be able to understand what is going on here.

08. Januar 2018 von mga010
Kategorien: English, Euler | Schreibe einen Kommentar

Journalists and Logic

The „Zeit“ titles „Die größte bekannte Primzahl ist gefunden“, in English „The biggest known prime number has been found“. The logic of this heading is so bizarre! The article is not saying much anyways.

06. Januar 2018 von mga010
Kategorien: Uncategorized | Schreibe einen Kommentar

A Geometric Problem

I found the following problem on my Google+ account: In the image below, the total length of the blue line segments is equal to the total length of the green line segments. The segments form an angle of 60° among each other.

Problem

After a while of thinking, I found a nice proof of this phenomenon. It is probably the standard proof, and it also yields a lot of generalizations.

We assume the black dot at (0,0) in the plane and denote the direction of the green line segments by vectors by v1, v2, and v3, all of them with length 1. Then

\(v_1+v_2+v_3=0\)

If we denote the lengths of the green segments with a1, a2 and a3, we have that

\(a_1v_1, \quad a_2v_2, \quad a_3a_3\)

are the endpoints of the segments. Now, let c be the center of the circle. We thus have

\(\|c-a_kv_k\| = \|c+b_kv_k\|\)

for k=1,2,3 if we denote the lengths of the blue segments with b1, b2, b3. Squaring this and using a bit of vector algebra, we get

\(– a_k (c \cdot v_k) + a_k^2 = b_k (c \cdot v_k) + b_k^2.\)

Here, the dot denotes the scalar product of two vectors. Thus

\(a_k – b_k = c \cdot v_k\)

Summing up for k=1,2,3 we get our conclusion

\(a_1+a_2+a_3 = b_1 + b_2 + b_3.\)

This generalizes to finitely many vectors which sum up to 0. E.g., we can take the sides of the following pentagram as vectors.

Penta

The corresponding result can be seen in the next figure.

PentaProblem

Of course, a special case is 10 line segments with equal angle 36° between them.

 

31. Dezember 2017 von mga010
Kategorien: Uncategorized | Schreibe einen Kommentar

Least Common Multiplier of First N Numbers

There is a famous result that is quite surprising if you see it the first time: The log of the least common multiplier of the first n integers is approximately n. The quotient converges to 1. Or to say it another way: It’s n-th root converges to e. You will find this result in the net. It is equivalent to the theorem about the distribution of prime numbers.

Let us check that with software.

>&load("functs");
>&lcm(makelist(n,n,1,500)), &log(float(%))/500
 
         7323962231895284659386387451904229882976133825128925904634919\
 003459630742080371339432775981989132698526831260664840887571331401331\
 362333709431244066365980335206141556095539831625389222073894558545019\
 7206138869521568000
 
 
                           1.003304233299495

Of course, this infinite integer arithmetic of Maxima is not an effective way to check the result. Instead, we can use the following code to get the quotient for much higher numbers.

>N=100000000;
>p=primes(N);
>f=floor(log(N)/log(p));
>longest sum(f*log(p))/N
      0.9999824279662022 

This is based on the following observation. To compute the least common multiplier of 1  to n, we have to compute

\(p_1^{k_1} \cdot \ldots \cdot p_m^{k_m}\)

for all primes p(i) less then n, where k(i) is the largest number so that

\(p_i^{k_i} \le n\)

The logarithm of this product is exactly what is computed in the code above. If we make this a function and compute it for N from 10 to 5000, we get the following graph.

test

30. Juni 2017 von mga010
Kategorien: Uncategorized | Schreibe einen Kommentar

Translating a Sage Example for EMT

The nice Sage Math project is something I am very interested in. It is a rather complete package for mathematical computations based on Python. If you are interested in open source math this is probably one good way to start. I must add however that I prefer open source packages directly based on Python with a command line (like IPython) instead of a web based interface that covers everything with another layer. The advantage of the latter is, of course, that it may provide additional services, e.g., for cooperation.

On Windows you will have to run Sage Math in a Virtual Box. You can then open the web interface in your normal Windows browser and work there.

I will certainly come back in this blog to Sage Math. For a start, let me translate an example of Sage Math into Euler Math Toolbox (EMT). It is an example for the famous Lotka-Volterra equations, representing the relation between predator and prey. As far as I can tell, Python uses a fourth order Runge-Kutta method to solve the differential equation numerically. The equations themselves are written in symbolic form. The package contains features for symbolic computations.

### Simulates Lotka-Volterra population dynamics, producing a vector field
### Arrows indicate the direction of population evolution
### The blue contour is one potential stable loop
var('t R F R0 F0 a b c d')
## CONSTANTS
a = 0.04         # rabbit birthrate
b = 0.0005       # probability of predation per encounter
c = 0.1*0.0005   # rabbit -> fox conversion efficiency
d = 0.2          # death rate of foxes
## INITIAL CONDITIONS
R0 = 5000     #initial number of rabbits
F0 = 200      #initial number of foxes

## DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS
de_R = (diff(R,t) == a*R - b*R*F)
de_F = (diff(F,t) == c*R*F - d*F)

## CALCULATION PARAMETERS
end_points = 500
stepsize = 1.0
steps = end_points/stepsize
ics = [0,R0,F0]
des = [de_R.rhs(), de_F.rhs()]

## NUMERICAL SOLUTION OF DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS
sol = desolve_system_rk4(des,[R,F],ics,ivar=t,
   end_points=end_points,step=stepsize)

## Clean up to graph
sol_t=[]; sol_R=[]; sol_F=[]
for i in range(steps):
    sol_t.append(sol[i][0])
    sol_R.append(sol[i][1])
    sol_F.append(sol[i][2])

a = plot([],figsize=[6,4])
a += line(zip(sol_R,sol_F))
a += plot_vector_field((des[0], des[1]), (R,0,7000), (F,0,225),
  xmin=1500,color='orange')
a.axes_labels(['Rabbits','Foxes']); show(a)

I entered that as is into the Sage Math browser and the following plot was produced. I had to copy the image out of the browser, because I have no idea on how to save the image with the browser interface. Let me also note that I do not understand every command above, though many of them are self explanatory.

1

Let us translate this too Euler Math Toolbox. We use the numerical side of EMT only, although we could have defined some functions in symbolic form. But it would not help much to do so.

>a=0.04; b=0.0005; c=0.1*b; d=0.2;
>R0=5000; F0=200;
>function dR ([R,F]) := a*R-b*R*F;
>function dF ([R,F]) := c*R*F-d*F;
>function f(x,y) := [dR(y),dF(y)];
>t=0:1:500;
>s=ode("f",t,[R0,F0]); 
>{x,y}=vectorfield2("dR","dF",min(s[1]),max(s[1]),min(s[2]),max(s[2]), ...
>   scale=0.005,<plot); 
>plot2d(s[1],s[2],color=blue, ...
>   xl="Rabbits",yl="Foxes");
>plot2d(x,y,>add,style="->",color=orange):

The result is the following, very similar, plot. However, the anti-aliasing is better, but that could be due to my lack of knowledge in Sage Math.

2

31. Mai 2017 von mga010
Kategorien: English, Euler | 2 Kommentare

Computing a Special Sum

I recently found the following problem in my Google+ account: What is

\(\dfrac{1}{2 \cdot 4} + \dfrac{1 \cdot 3}{2 \cdot 4 \cdot 6} + \dfrac{1 \cdot 3 \cdot 5}{2 \cdot 4 \cdot 6 \cdot 8} + \ldots\)

This kind of sum of growing products can often be solved with the following trick.

\(1 = a_1 + (1-a_1) = a_1 + (1-a_1) a_2 + (1-a_1)(1-a_2) = \ldots\)

The n-th iteration of this process has yields

\(1 = a_1 + \ldots + (1-a_1)\ldots(1-a_n)a_{n+1} + (1-a_1)\ldots(1-a_{n+1}).\)

This is true for any sequence a_n. If we want to let n go to infinity we need to control the last term in this sum. We want to know its limit. E.g.,

\(1 = \sum\limits_{k=1}^\infty \left( a_{k+1} \prod\limits_{l=1}^k (1-a_l) \right)\)

will be true only if

\(\lim\limits_{k \to \infty} \prod\limits_{l=1}^k (1-a_l)  = 0.\)

We can use

\(\log(1-h) \le -h \qquad\text{for } 0 \le h < 1\)

and get the following estimate

\(\log \prod\limits_{l=1}^k (1-a_k) = \sum\limits_{l=1}^k \log (1-a_l) \le – \sum\limits_{l=1}^k a_l.\)

Thus for positive a(l), not larger than 1,

\(\sum\limits_{k=1}^\infty a_l = \infty \quad\Rightarrow\quad \prod\limits_{l=1}^\infty (1-a_k) = 0. \tag1\)

Note that the right conclusion is also true, if the a_l do not converge to 0, but are bounded by 1.

Now we simply apply all this with

\(a_k = \dfrac{1}{2k}\)

and get that the sum above is equal to 1/2.

For the records, we study the conclusion (1) in more detail. First of all for positive a_l between 0 and 1, we get

\(\sum\limits_{k=1}^\infty a_l = \infty \quad\Leftrightarrow\quad \prod\limits_{l=1}^\infty (1-a_l) = 0.\)

We can use the estimate

\(– 2h \le \log(1-h) \le -h \qquad\text{for } 0 \le h < \dfrac{1}{2}<h\)

for this. In case, infinitely many a(l) are larger that 1/2, the result is obvious.

In a similar way we can prove for positive a(l)

\(\sum\limits_{k=1}^\infty a_l = \infty \quad\Leftrightarrow\quad \prod\limits_{l=1}^\infty (1+a_l) < \infty.\)

If the a(l) negative and positive things get more involved.

 

18. Mai 2017 von mga010
Kategorien: Uncategorized | Schreibe einen Kommentar

Python in EMT – Cross Sum of Cubes

When is the cross sum (sum of the digits) of the cube of a number equal to the number?

It is obviously true for n=0 and n=1. You might be able to find n=8 with the cube 512. Then, how do you prove that there are finitely many numbers? How long will it take to find all numbers?

For a dirty estimate we have

\((9m)^3 \ge (a_0+\ldots+a_{m-1})^3 = a_0+a_1 10 + \ldots + a_{m-1} 10^{m-1} \ge 10^{m-1}\)

It is an easy exercise to show that m<7 is necessary. So we only have to check up to n=100. The cube of 100 has already 7 digits. This can be done by hand with some effort, but here is a Python program written in Euler Math Toolbox.

>function python qs (n) ...
$s=0
$while n>0:
$   s+=n%10;
$   n/=10
$return s
$endfunction
>function python test() ...
$v=[]
$for k in range(100):
$   if k == qs(k**3):
$       v.append(k)
$return v
$endfunction
>test()
 [0,  1,  8,  17,  18,  26,  27]

 

30. März 2017 von mga010
Kategorien: English, Euler | Schreibe einen Kommentar

Recursion Formulas

I do not know if I ever wrote about this. But it is a well known theory, anyways. To find a formula for the Fibonacci numbers

\(F_{n+1} = F_n + F_{n-1}, \quad F_0 = 0, \quad F_1 = 1\)

you can use the „Ansatz“

\(F_n = c^n\)

you will immediately find that c must satisfy

\(c^2 = c + 1\)

The two solutions for this equation can both generate the recursion formulas as well as any linear combination of them. So our Ansatz yields

\(F_n = a c_1^n + b c_2^n = a \left(\dfrac{1+\sqrt{2}}{2}\right)^n + b \left(\dfrac{1-\sqrt{2}}{2}\right)^n\)

Observe the logic that we followed here! All we know by know is that if F(n) is defined by this formula, it will satisfy the recursion formula for the Fibonacci sequence. On the other hand, it is easy to find a and b such that F(0)=0, F(1)=1. Then we know that we have indeed found the correct formula for the sequence. I.e.,

\(F_n = a c_1^n + b c_2^n = \dfrac{1}{\sqrt{5}} \left( \left(\dfrac{1+\sqrt{2}}{2}\right)^n – \left(\dfrac{1-\sqrt{2}}{2}\right)^n\right)\)

We have also shown that any sequence which satisfies the recursion must be of that form with proper constants a and b. This is so, since we can determine a and b for any start values.

Due the fact that c(2) is between -1 and 0, we get

\(F_n = \text{round } \dfrac{1}{\sqrt{5}} \left(\dfrac{1+\sqrt{2}}{2}\right)^n\)

Now, if we take other start values, what happens? E.g., consider the numbers

\(L_n = \left(\dfrac{1+\sqrt{2}}{2}\right)^n + \left(\dfrac{1-\sqrt{2}}{2}\right)^n\)

The start values are then L(0)=2 and L(1)=1. We simply get another integer sequence. And we get the strange fact that

$latex \left(\dfrac{1+\sqrt{2}}{2}\right)^n$

gets closer and closer to integers. This has been observed by Yves Meyer and mentioned in a blog post recently by J. D. Cook. So I came to write this short article. The difference, computed in Euler Math Toolbox, is as follows

>p1 = (1+sqrt(5))/2
 1.61803398875
>p2 = (1-sqrt(5))/2
 -0.61803398875
>n=0:19; longest (p1^n)'
                       1 
       1.618033988749895 
       2.618033988749895 
        4.23606797749979 
       6.854101966249686 
       11.09016994374948 
       17.94427190999916 
       29.03444185374864 
       46.97871376374781 
       76.01315561749645 
       122.9918693812443 
       199.0050249987407 
        321.996894379985 
       521.0019193787257 
       842.9988137587108 
       1364.000733137437 
       2206.999546896147 
       3571.000280033584 
       5777.999826929732 
       9349.000106963316 
>p1^n+p2^n
 [2,  1,  3,  4,  7,  11,  18,  29,  47,  76,  123,  199,  322,  521,
 843,  1364,  2207,  3571,  5778,  9349]

The difference to the next integer is of course a power of p2 goes to zero geometrically fast.

22. März 2017 von mga010
Kategorien: English, Euler | Schreibe einen Kommentar

Sensor Size and Image Quality

If you are confused about the effect the sensor size makes to your image quality you are not alone. In this post, I try to explain a good part of these problems. I try to do that without any math. But I assume some basic background in photography.

We wish to learn about the effect of a smaller sensor size to the depth of field, the background blurriness and the noise. Those are important ingredients for the image quality. For portraits, we wish to have a noise free and blurry background. For night shots, we wish to have as little noise as possible.

Let us do a thought experiment to understand the topic. Imagine, we could make the world smaller by a factor of 2 in all dimensions. We would shrink a full frame camera to a 4/3 camera. The shrunken camera is then said to have a crop factor of 2. Note that we shrink everything to half its size: the sensor width and height (e.g. from 36 x 24 to 18 x 12), the focal length (e.g. from 50mm to 25mm) and the open width of the aperture at any given F stop (e.g. from 5mm to 2.5mm).

First of all, the angle of view remains exactly the same for our 25mm lens compared to the 50mm in full frame. So the image shows the same things as before, even if we would not shrink the world.

Moreover, the light that comes through the lens is only 1/4 of the light, since our aperture has only 1/4 of the area than before. But the distance to the sensor plane is only 1/2, and so we get the same amount of light per square mm. If we used film we would get the same exposure. That explains why we compute the F stop by dividing the aperture by the focal length. This stays the same in our shrunken camera. Thus we use F8 no matter what size of camera we have.

But some important things change.

(1) Our light is on the same level for the smaller camera. So each pixel gets only 1/4 of the light. Remember that the pixels are smaller too. But the pixels produce the same amount of noise. The noise does not depend much on the size of the pixel. Thus the noise level in relation to the signal strength for each pixel increases by quite an amount. We can say by a factor 4. The image gets noisier.

(2) The objects do not shrink or get closer by a factor of 2. If they would we’d get the same depth of field and blurriness in our image. But a man in 10 meters distance is still the same in the same distance. So we have to change our focus by moving the lens further to the sensor plane. Of course, the camera will do that for us automatically. The effect of this is known to any photographer and is quite obvious: If we focus on something further away the background gets sharper. For practical purposes we can say it gets twice as sharp when the distance is doubled.

What that means is that you get a less blurry background and more noise at the same settings.

That’s bad. The good point is that you also get a larger depth of field around the object if you need that.

To compensate for this you can double the aperture size, i.e., increase by two stops (e.g. from F4 to F2), and decrease your ISO by two stops to compensate (e.g. from ISO 400 to ISO 100). Your sensor will then get the same amount of light and your noise will be the same. Moreover, your background blurriness is the same too. It is a bit complicated to compute, but your depth of field around your object will also be approximately the same. You get the same image quality.

In terms of image quality for images with an object and a background, you can replace a full frame 80mm lens at ISO400 and F4 with a 40mm lens for your 4/3 system at ISO100 and F2.

But, of course, your full frame lens might allow you to shoot at ISO100 and F2. You have no chance to cope with this on a 4/3 system. For you would need ISO25 and F1. The full frame camera offers more opportunities. It is also more bulky and expensive.

If you do not care about the background or you want more sharpness all across the frame the small camera seems to favor you. But you still have more noise at the same settings.

In terms of noise for night photography or landscapes, you get the same noise with ISO400 on the full frame and with ISO100 on a 4/3 system. To compensate, you need more light by increasing the aperture or the exposure time.

By the way, measurements at various camera sites in the net confirm this finding. With the same F stop on the same image, the full frame camera can be shot at ISO 800, the APS-C camera at ISO 400 and the 4/3 camera at ISO 200, and all will produce the same noise. Pictures will still look different due to the different background blurriness.

 

20. Januar 2017 von mga010
Kategorien: Uncategorized | Schreibe einen Kommentar

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